All posts by Jacqueline Clark

Revealing Advantage Agents: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Revealing Advantage Agents: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

As an agent of a Medicare Advantage plan, I can understand the stigma faced by insurance agents. Fortunately, I am not suitable for the prototype of a stereotyped salesman for a car, but I know many agents who do it.

As the open record is almost complete and many people are opting to switch from Medicare Advantage to Medicare Advantage for 2020 at https://www.2020medicareadvantage.com , I thought I could say my opinion about choosing the right agent, in case consumers want to separate the good, the bad & the ugly. A quality that separates agents is the method of generating leads and for those who work. Although makeshift calls have now become illegal, lots of health service providers of Medicare still locate persons whose numbers are not included in the exclusive mobile numbers and take time to contact the consumers who unknowingly are not needed.

If you receive a call from an agent and you do not know how they found your phone number, drop the call. This officer is violating federal law and we cannot say what that officer could do. Independent agents, that is, agents who work for all, are generally responsible for cold and contracted requests. This however does not imply that there are no independent agents who are reliable on the ground.

Amazingly, independent agents may be among the best in the industry, as long as they do not resort to withdrawals or cold calls. Why? First of all, most agents work in the main call centers or in the post office. If you work with a large call center, in thousands, you are just a customer. Agents that work for one provider cannot provide more than one offer. Never talk to an agent who only works for one supplier, because I can assure you that you will hear a sales imbalance, that all consumers, in all markets, must suffer. Independent agents do not encounter any of these problems. They are usually stipulated with several operators for your locality and have a sizeable customer base, thus making it one sure way to find the cheapest rate for a Medicare reload plan.

Disclaimer: Certain smaller call centers do not expand to a large extent and are a great place to shop around. Generally speaking, you need to stay clear of anyone who will not assist you in your purchase, that is, from someone who does not understand that you want to hear more than one option available. Agents that only offer one type of plan, especially plan F, cannot be considered reliable. “But I expected plan F to be the best plan?” In terms of insurance, you’re right; plan F is the most complete. However, in terms of commission income, Plan F is the most economical plan an agent can sell or promote for you.

If you talk to an agent who does not want to discuss other plans with you at any time, I can assure you that agent probably

  1. very greedy and nobody likes an insurance agent who is greedy or
  2. lacks experience at work.

Primary Guide to Medicare Health Plans (Part C)

Primary Guide to Medicare Health Plans (Part C)

The additional insurance and benefits of Medicare Part A & B are categorized under Medicare Health Plans (Part C). Medicare Part D or prescribed drugs are included in most of these Plans. If you decide to sign up for any of the Advantage Plans offered by private companies, you can do so if you already have regular Medicare insurance. You will not need all of these insurance and Medigap insurance if you sign up for Plan C.

The distinction between the original Plans of Medicare and Medicare Advantage

Although everything Medicare normally covers is insured by a Medicare Advantage Plan, there are some differences between them. Most of the time, the difference is in the value you pay for your medical care. Some of these differences include:

  • insurance or payment of another percentage of medical expenses
  • deductible
  • Co-payment
  • in the network vs. off the grid
  • Network of available providers

In addition, emergency medicine and emergency care are included in the Medicare Advantage Plans (Part C). In some situations, dental routine, wellness programs and/or routine vision may also be insured by some Plans. Most of them are insured by Part D. However, Part C insurance does not insure hospital care, even as part of a public health Plan, as they are still insured by Medicare.

The different types of Medicare Advantage Part C Plans

To determine what type of Part C Plan will facilitate your needs, you will need to consider the different types of Plans currently available. There are several Plans, including:

MSA – Medical economic Plan

HMO – Health care organization Plan

POS – Point of service Plan

SNP – Special Requirements Plans

PFFS – Pricing Plan for Private Service

PPO – Preferred provider organization Plan

Information on these six types of Plans is available online, simply type the acronym or full words in the Google search.

Choose your Plan carefully. Outside of the date you were authorized to participate for the first time and in other private situations that qualify for a certain period, you can only change the Plans once a year during the annual election period. The annual mandate is from October 15 to December 7 of each year.

There is also a Medicare Advantage exclusion period, which runs from January 1 to February 14. Meanwhile, people enrolled in a Medicare Advantage Plan can cancel their Plan and recover the original Medicare insurance.

It should also be noted that Medicare Advantage Plans vary by place of residence so find one here https://www.2020medicareadvantage.org, with or without insurance of prescribed medications.

Registration of Part C

Finally, the procedure for registering Medicare Advantage Plans (Part C) varies depending on the insurance company chosen. The access times are, however, identical. Enrollment is allowed when you qualify for Medicare, but a 7-month waiting period begins 90 days before you turn 65 and continues 120 days later. If you are under 65 and receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), you will not be eligible if you have not received an SSDI for up to 2 years and 1 month.